Last edited by Tygotaur
Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of Celtic and Anglo-Saxon kingship found in the catalog.

Celtic and Anglo-Saxon kingship

Daniel A Binchy

Celtic and Anglo-Saxon kingship

the O"Donnell lectures for 1967-8; delivered in the University ofOxford on 23 and 24 May 1968.

by Daniel A Binchy

  • 313 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Clarendon Press in Oxford .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Great Britain -- Kings and rulers.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    SeriesThe O"Donnell lectures -- 1967/8
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvii, 53 p. ;
    Number of Pages53
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19569731M

    Anglo-Saxon Kingship and Political Power: Rex gratia Dei is available in hardback and ebook formats. Kathrin McCann introduces her new book, Anglo-Saxon Kingship and Political Power: Rex gratia Dei. During the late 8th century it was said that England’s powerful ruler, King Offa of Mercia, sought to depose Pope Hadrian. Buy Alfred the Great: War, Kingship and Culture in Anglo-Saxon England: War, Culture and Kingship in Anglo-Saxon England (The Medieval World) 1 by Abels, Richard Philip (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(9).

      Book of Uí Mhaine Conference, On 2 nd March the Royal Irish Academy hosted a two-day conference at Dublin on the late fourteenth-century manuscript Leabhar Ua Maine or Book of Uí Mhaine. Twelve speakers presented papers on various aspects of this manuscript, ranging from early modern poetry to illumination, among whom was ASNC’s P Author: Anglo-Saxon, Norse, And Celtic. This is book 92 in the series, and a full list of titles in the series can be found at: Cambridge, and the Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic (also Cambridge), at which I completed my undergraduate and postgraduate - Kingship and Consent in Anglo-Saxon England, Assemblies and the State in the Early.

    Prof Michael Clarke continued with the exploration of the verses on world-kingship by placing them in an international context, linking the poetry with mainland European monastic cultures and tentatively positing a link with the material found in the Book of Uí Mhaine and the contents of the library of King Richard II. Anglo-Saxon, Norse Location: Cambridge, United Kingdom. Inspired by studies of Carolingian Europe, Kingship, Society and the Church in Anglo-Saxon Yorkshire argues that the social strategies of local kin-groups drove conversion to Christianity and church building in Yorkshire from AD.


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Celtic and Anglo-Saxon kingship by Daniel A Binchy Download PDF EPUB FB2

Celtic and Anglo-Saxon kingship. [Daniel Anthony Binchy] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library. Create lists, bibliographies and reviews: or Search WorldCat. Find items in libraries near you.

Celtic and Anglo-Saxon Kingship: The O'Donnell Lectures for ; Delivered in the University of Oxford on 23 and 24 May Daniel A. Binchy Oxford U.P., - Anglo-Saxons - 53 pages. The Sutton Hoo whetstone sceptre is the most enigmatic and mysterious emblem of kingship of the early Middle Ages.

Produced around AD and long held to be Anglo-Saxon, Enright establishes that the sceptre is undoubtedly a British artefact, one that reflects a /5(3). The Dissertation in Celtic & Anglo-Saxon Studies is for Senior Honours students registered in the Celtic & Anglo-Saxon Studies degree programme.

It will consist of approximately 3 one-hour tutorials, to provide students with guidance on selecting a suitable academic topic and developing a. Get this from a library. Celtic and Anglo-Saxon kingship: the O'Donnell lectures for ; delivered in the University of Oxford on 23 and 24 May [Daniel A Binchy].

This book, written by leading experts, brings together new research that represents the best of the current scholarship on the nexus between authority and written sources from Anglo-Saxon England.

Ranging from the seventh to the eleventh century, the chapters in this volume offer fresh approaches to a wide range of linguistic, historical, legal.

Germanic kingship is a thesis regarding the role of kings (called Konungrs) among the pre-Christianized Germanic tribes of the Migration period (c. – AD) and Early Middle Ages (c.

–1, AD). The thesis holds that the institution of feudal monarchy developed, through contact with the Roman Empire and the Christian Church, from an earlier custom of sacral and military kingship.

Bassett, S. (ed.) (), The Origins of Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms (Studies in the Early History of Britain), Leicester Binchy, D. (), Celtic and Anglo-Saxon Kingship, Oxford Binchy, D. (), ‘ An archaic legal poem ’, Celtica 9Cited by: The Origins of Anglo-Saxon Kingship 3 The Writings of Saint Patrick p.

The Gallic Chronicles of and p. Gildas’s De excidio et conquestu Britanniae p. Procopius’s History of the Wars p. Conclusions p. Celtic and Anglo-Saxon Kingship: The O'Donnell Lectures for ; Delivered in the University of Oxford on 23 and 24 May by Daniel A Binchy starting at $ Celtic and Anglo-Saxon Kingship: The O'Donnell Lectures for ; Delivered in the University of Oxford on 23 and 24 May has 1 available editions to buy at Half Price Books Marketplace.

Much of early medieval Celtic and Anglo-Saxon art is based on the display of motifs – key, interlacing, spiral and zoomorphic – in well-defined panels in simple and complex arrays. A study of the arrangement of the panels and the fine detail of the motifs indicates that the artists relied on geometric methods and principles first used by Egyptians and Greeks.

The cult of kingship in Anglo-Saxon England: the transition from paganism to Christianity. Manchester University Press, ^ Jennbert, Kristina (). The Horse and its role in Icelandic burial practices, mythology, and society. – ^ Sikora, Maeve. "Diversity in Viking Age Horse Burial: A Comparative Study of Norway, Iceland.

- Explore mpowell's board "Celtic/Anglo-Saxon" on Pinterest. See more ideas about Anglo saxon, Celtic and Anglo saxon history pins. In a fifteen-page article in the journal Anglo-Saxon England, published inMichael Enright argued on art-historical grounds that the somewhat enigmatic whetstone sceptre found among the grave goods of Mound One at the seventh-century Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Sutton Hoo was of ‘Celtic’nearly a quarter of a century later, he returns to this hypothesis with a Author: Alex Woolf.

The Sutton Hoo whetstone sceptre is the most enigmatic and mysterious emblem of kingship of the Early Middle Ages. Produced c AD and long held to be Anglo-Saxon, the author of the present work argued in that it was actually made by Celtic craftsmen who.

I INTRODUCTION: THE ORIGINS OF THE ANGLO-SAXON KINGDOMS 1 Written sources: British 1 Written sources: Anglo-Saxon 3 Archaeological evidence 5 The political structure of Anglo-Saxon England c.

9 The nature of early Anglo-Saxon kingship 15 Sources for the study of kings and kingdoms from the seventh to the ninth centuries 19 II KENT 25 Sources Discover the Anglo-Saxons: Kings and Warriors by Moira Butterfield. Offers a look at the role of kingship and military culture in Anglo-Saxon society, focusing on.

Works on Anglo-Saxon kingship often take as their starting point the line from Beowulf: ‘that was a good king’. This monograph, however, explores what it means to be a king, and how kings defined their own kingship in opposition to other powers. Episodes of decapitation from both hagiography and Celtic folklore recorded during the second half of the Anglo-Saxon period in Britain share many similar details--including the retention of speech and animation following the event of decapitation and a lack of decay--and these details are strongly connected to concepts of Anglo-Saxon : Emily Walley.

Celtic and Anglo-Saxon Kingship: The O'Donnell Lectures for ; Delivered in the University of Oxford on 23 and 24 May by Daniel A Binchy starting at. Celtic and Anglo-Saxon Kingship: The O'Donnell Lectures for ; Delivered in the University of Oxford on 23 and 24 May has 1 available editions to buy at Half Price Books Marketplace.

The apogee of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom -- The reign of Earwig -- The reign of Edgar: Secular politics -- Ecclesiastical reform -- The nadir of Anglo-Saxon kingship -- Civil War and anti-monastic reaction -- The resumption of Danish raiding and its effects -- The Danish conquest -- Pages: CHAPTER 3 Baptism and Sponsorship in the Anglo-Saxon Church before (pp.

) Although there may have been significant variations in detail, the approximate contours of a solemn baptism with sponsorship in seventh-century Italy and Frankish Gaul have been established.The cult of kingship was central to pagan Anglo-Saxon society.

The king was equivalent to the position of high priest. By his divine descent he represented or indeed was the "luck" of the people.

[72] The central importance of the institution of kingship is illustrated by the twenty-six synonyms for "king" employed by the Beowulf poet. [73].